Media Clippings


A compilation of every mention of Indonesian writers, written on English/foreign-language media. See also What Media Say.


Balai Pustaka, TVRI to make ‘Siti Nurbaya’ television series

Jul 05, 2018 / Jakarta Post
Marah Rusli's classic novel Siti Nurbaya is set to grace the small screen, as state-owned publisher Balai Pustaka and television station TVRI get working on a modern adaptation with the aim of reintroducing the tale about arranged marriage to millennials. Speaking during the inauguration of the Istana Peradaban (Palace of Civilization) at Balai Pustaka's headquarters in Jakarta earlier this week, the publishing company's president director Achmad Fachrodji said both parties were still discussing story ideas in order to suit today's audience, which he said was dominated by millennials.

A writer’s festival in Makassar: The secret to its success — people power!

May 09, 2018 / Personal Blog by Jan Cornall
It’s been a while since I attended a festival in Indonesia. Last decade I was a regular visitor to Java, taking part in Utan Kayu Bienale, (Jakarta, Bandung, Lampung) Salihara Biennale( Jakarta), Perfurbance (Jogjakarta) and Mata Air (Salitiga). When I told aussie friends I was going to attend MIWF, a writer’s festival in Makassar, many replied, where’s that?

Writers’ Series 2018 encourages creation of positive narrations

May 06, 2018 / Jakarta Post
The annual Writers' Series held by The Jakarta Post Writing Center returns for the third time this weekend. Running two days until May 6, the first day of the event, which was a mini conference, took place in the Upper Room, Annex Building, Central Jakarta. Meanwhile, the second day will host a premium workshop at the Post’s office in Palmerah, West Jakarta.

Literature plays crucial role as Indonesia enters 20th year of reformation

May 04, 2018 / Jakarta Post by Keshie Hernitaningtyas
As Indonesia celebrates its 20th year of reformation this year, literature plays a crucial role in reminding us of the importance of learning from history, says University of Indonesia cultural science professor Melani Budianta. “The reformation may still feel new for some people, yet it has changed [many things] rapidly that we need to look back to process it. Learning from history is very important so that we don’t forget what we are fighting for and make the same mistakes all over again. Why literature? Because it has the potential to open our imagination; allowing us to imagine something outside of what exists today,” said Melani during a discussion themed “20 Years of Reform”, among the events at the Makassar International Writers Festival that took place at Makassar Muhammadiyah University on Thursday.

The new wave: emerging female writers push the boundaries

May 04, 2018 / The Sydney Morning Herald by Melanie Kembrey
Intan Paramaditha​'s English-language debut collection, Apple and Knife, consists of short stories published in bahasa Indonesia in 2005 and 2010. They are set in Indonesia, bend and blend genres, and bristle with feminist rage and resistance. "I wanted to write stories about women in Indonesia and I just thought it was important to tell stories about bad women, about disobedient women, about women who resist," Paramaditha, who is an academic at Macquarie University, said.

Review: 2018 Varuna Sydney Writers’ Festival

May 04, 2018 / ArtsHub by Katie Lavers
Dias Novita Wuri - Feminist Perspectives featured a dialogue between Dias Novita Wuri, a young writer visiting Australia on the 2018 Tulis Australia-Indonesia Writing Exchange and spending five weeks in a residency at Varuna, in conversation with the Varuna alumni, writer Zoya Patel. The two writers spoke about issues affecting them both as young Muslim women writers, one from Indonesia, the other born in Australia with a Fijian/Indian background. The discussion showed the vital importance of creating space for intercultural feminist dialogue such as this.

Six UK publishers join ‘Literature Visit’ to Jakarta, Makassar

May 02, 2018 / Jakarta Post
Representatives from United Kingdom-based publishers are taking part in the “Literature Visit” program supported by the British Council held from April 30 to May 6 that aims to expand cooperation and networks in literature and creative thinking. The program, which includes taking the participants to the Jakarta and Makassar International Writers Festival, which runs on May 2-5 in Makassar, South Sulawesi, is part of the British Council’s support for Indonesia’s participation as the market-focus country at the London Book Fair 2019.

Makassar writers festival to return to Fort Rotterdam

May 01, 2018 / Jakarta Post
The eighth Makassar International Writers Festival (MIWF) is to be held from May 2 to 5 at Fort Rotterdam, several campuses and other locations across Makassar, South Sulawesi. Initiated by independent cultural organization Rumata’ Artspace, the event has been given the theme “Voice/Noise” and is set to highlight several important topics related to current affairs, in Makassar, nationally and globally, such as the 20th year of Indonesian reformation, the 2018 simultaneous regional elections, preparations for the 2019 presidential election, the growing cooperation between communities worldwide to respond to social phenomena and the rise of literature and cultural collaborations between different countries that were independently initiated by global citizens.

Is Indonesian Literature Written in English Still Indonesian Literature?

Apr 12, 2018 / Jakarta Globe by Dhania Putri Sarahtika
In 2015, a short story collection "Monsoon Tiger and Other Stories" by Indonesian author Rain Chudori was published by Kepustakaan Populer Gramedia (KPG), one of the biggest publishers of serious literature in Indonesia. The entire book was written originally in English. Rain published another book in English last year, a novel called "Imaginary City," under KPG’s new imprint Comma Books, where Rain also works as a curator. Rain said she chooses to write in English because of all the languages she uses everyday – from Minang to French – it's the one she finds most comfortable writing in.

‘Writing on Diversity’: Taking up stories against intolerance

Mar 31, 2018 / Jakarta Post by Devina Heriyanto
"We should not be afraid of the consequences. Everything we put out there is being scrutinized, used to humiliate us," said Devi Asmarani, chief editor of feminist publication Magdalene, about how more people should speak out and voice their stories to counter intolerance. Devi was a member of the speaker panel at "Writing on Diversity", an event hosted by The Jakarta Post and The Jakarta Post Writing Center in partnership with Raffles Hotel Jakarta and British Council Indonesia. Along Devi were former chief editor of The Jakarta Post Endy Bayuni and British Council Indonesia country director Paul Smith.
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